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I know the Milstein, Schumsky, and especially the Grumiaux--which I
settled upon--but the Heifetz reading helped me grasp the piece for the
first time.  Within a seemingly unbroken arc of supreme concentration
from beginning to end, Heifetz' crisp articulation, his lighting and
shading of the different variations, unabashed virtuosity, and finally
his clarity of the different lines kept me entranced throughout.  (I
found a .99 cent original LM mono RCA pressing.)

I looked for reviews to see what others felt and other than positive
nods towards Heifetz' virtuosity, many felt that his Chaconne as too
"cool." I've become familiar with Heifetz through my collecting of lp's
as he's one of the "poster boys of the "Golden Age of Stereo" and I can
understand the complaint--I don't like his Sibelius Violin Concerto at
all (where's the "heart" in the slow mov't?)--but not in the Chaconne.
For me the violinist's clarity actually enhanced the emotion in Bach's
utterance.  Thoughts?

John Smyth <[log in to unmask]>

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