LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for CLASSICAL Archives


CLASSICAL Archives

CLASSICAL Archives


CLASSICAL@COMMUNITY.LSOFT.COM


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CLASSICAL Home

CLASSICAL Home

CLASSICAL  March 2005

CLASSICAL March 2005

Subject:

Re: Crumbs From The NPR Table

From:

Rick Mabry <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 4 Mar 2005 13:41:17 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (71 lines)

Karl Miller responds to Kevin Sutton:

>>So, I say again, since the public pays for public radio, they should
>>get what they want.
>
>Since the public pays for education should the public determine the
>content of education?

Unfortunately, there is a thriving subculture of the education bidness
who subscribe to the "student as customer" model.  Gag me with a spoon:
the vast majority of our students want to be spoon fed and gag at the
mere sight of a full course meal, especially if it has an entree they
haven't ever heard of.

Here is how this customer model fails:

1.  The customers are not always right (to put it mildly; I teach
mathematics).

2.  To be more serious, my customers love to be ripped off.  First,
the less you give them for their money, the happier they are.  Second,
if your business is closed for the day, they are happy to pay anyway.

"Hey, Mister, can you sub-size that?" Heck, they might even pay extra
to have classes cancelled.  Not that I blame them --- I was a student,
too.  (Come to think of it, I have been at concerts that I couldn't wait
to end, even when I thought they were good, and even when I was enjoying
them and had paid a hefty sum!  Weird.)

3.  The biggest ripoffs in the "bidness" get the greatest rewards.

I'm speaking of the spoon and pablum feeders, who get great student
evaluations (and raises, thereby) for being extremely easy.  No, this
isn't sour grapes.

4.  Students are more product than customer.  Most of them aren't paying
anyway, or at least it is a very small chunk of the cost.

Hmm, maybe #3 shows that education IS becoming a business, but maybe
that's the point.

Have I digressed?  Well, it just reminds me of the current discussion.
"Customers" in our culture are taught to be happy with less and less.
Somebody gave a great quote to that effect, something like, "What the
people get, the people want".  Even when it makes them fat, rots their
teeth, atrophies their mind or numbs their senses.

It's funny, those of us who would listen to classical music on our own
pay for it willingly and up-front.  We might contribute to public radio,
but we buy concert tickets and CD's.  When we try to justify classical
music on the radio being paid for with public money, i.e., taxes, we
speak of it as education.  But I wager that most of us don't consider
it to be for our own education, but for others, for the public enlightenment.

So which is it, entertainment or education?  If the latter, it makes
sense for the public to pay, but maybe it still makes more sense for it
to be done in the schools.  Having lost that battle (have we?) it seems
almost dishonest (well, maybe just sneaky) to do it with public radio.
But that depends on who is allegedly being educated.

On the other hand, I am indeed willing to fork over some taxes in support
of education/arts/entertainment for one and all.  I want people to hear
what they haven't heard.  I guess it's just a form of proselytising.

I think that makes me one of them [L-word deleted]'s.

But I also want to learn something myself, which is why it aggravates
me to hear "Planets" every other day.  If public radio is just playing
requests, it isn't really educational.

Rick

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
July 1997

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



COMMUNITY.LSOFT.COM

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager